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Digital certificates to boost controls over spread of plant pests and diseases

Digital certificates to boost controls over spread of plant pests and diseases


 


e-Phyto set to enhance secure information-sharing between countries and cut costs


 


19 March 2015, Rome -The creation of a new global electronic certification system that will help curb the spread of plant pests and diseases through international trade in a more  secure and cost-effective way has been approved by representatives from 181 countries.


 


The Commission on Phytosanitary Measures (CPM), the governing body of the International Plant Protection Convention agreed to develop a global system of electronic phytosanitary certificates, known as e-Phyto, FAO said today. The decision means that the complex, bureaucratic process whereby millions of paper phytosanitary certificates are created, printed, and exchanged between countries each year, will eventually be replaced by an online electronic system.


 

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Digital certificates to boost controls over spread of plant pests and diseases

Digital certificates to boost controls over spread of plant pests and diseases


 


e-Phyto set to enhance secure information-sharing between countries and cut costs


 


19 March 2015, Rome -The creation of a new global electronic certification system that will help curb the spread of plant pests and diseases through international trade in a more  secure and cost-effective way has been approved by representatives from 181 countries.


 


The Commission on Phytosanitary Measures (CPM), the governing body of the International Plant Protection Convention agreed to develop a global system of electronic phytosanitary certificates, known as e-Phyto, FAO said today. The decision means that the complex, bureaucratic process whereby millions of paper phytosanitary certificates are created, printed, and exchanged between countries each year, will eventually be replaced by an online electronic system.


 

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Fly prompts US ban on Dominican Republic fruit - Dominican Today

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Washington.- The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) on Wednesday issued import restrictions on “host commodities from the Dominican Republic into or through the United States,” on detection of the Mediterranean Fruit Fly (Ceratitis capitata) in the Caribbean nation.

“Effective immediately, APHIS is restricting imports of certain fruits and vegetables from the Dominican Republic into the United States to prevent the introduction of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly). APHIS is also prohibiting overland in-bond transit movements of these materials south of 39° latitude in the United States. APHIS is taking this action in response to multiple detections of Medfly in the Punta Cana region of the Dominican Republic,” APHIS said.

The following commodities are prohibited from the Dominican Republic: avocado, Clementine, grape, grapefruit, lemon, litchi, longan, mamey (sapote), mandarin, mango, orange, papaya, pepper, pummel, tangelo, tangerine, tomato and tuna (cactus fruit)

 

China imposes new limits on imports of Norwegian salmon - Reuters

OSLO (Reuters) - China will impose new restrictions on imports of salmon from Norway due to fears that Beijing could make fish diseases, said Wednesday the authority of the Nordic country food.

The authority, which stated that the fish are safe, said that China stop imports from the March 23 whole salmon from the northern cities of South Tronderlag, Nordland and Troms, which represented about one fifth of Norwegian exports in 2014.

For products other areas, China will require certificates from April 18 to ensure that the fish are free of PD and viruses that cause infectious salmon anemia (ISA, for its acronym in English), the agency added.

"We believe there is no danger of infection for the Chinese salmon ISA virus, because the products from Norway go directly to the consumer," the authority said in a statement, adding "that the ISA virus is not harmful to people."

The agency said it would continue extending certificates for export as usual.

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On the road with mobile abattoirs

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IF it's complicated to get your livestock to an abattoir, how about have the abattoir come to you?

That’s the principle behind Mobile Slaughter Units (MSUs), a concept much discussed in Australia but actually in use in the United States.

Pilbara grazier Annabelle Coppin went to study MSUs in the United States in 2009, seeking a solution to the 2000 kilometres between her family’s Pilbara, Western Australia, cattle station and the nearest abattoir, at Gin Gin near Perth.

Ms Coppin travelled on a George Alexander Foundation scholarship and comprehensively wrote up her experiences in a International Specialised Skills Institute report.

Six years later, Ms Coppin still thinks MSUs could play a role in the Australian beef industry - and still thinks, as she thought in 2009, that red tape is the main hurdle to their development.

“If I wanted to develop a mobile slaughter unit, I’d have to employ someone for 12 months just to deal with the regulations,” she told Fairfax Media this week.

NACA Newsletter, January March 2015 - Publications

Published: 16/3/2015 | 261 views | Culture-based fisheries, Gender, Genetics and biodiversity, Hatchery and reproduction, Health, India, Vietnam

Regional consultation on culture-based fisheries developments in Asia

Gender Assessment Synthesis Workshop

NACA participation in the 5th Global Symposium on Gender in Aquaculture and Fisheries, Lucknow, India

Broodstock Management in Aquaculture: Long term effort required for regional capacity building

Urgent appeal to control spread of the shrimp microsporidian parasite Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP)

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No slave labour in our fishmeal supply chain-Thailand's CPF - Reuters

BANGKOK, March 17 (Reuters) - Charoen Pokphand Foods PCL (CPF), Thailand's largest meat and animal feed producer, said it has imposed stricter measures against labour abuse and insists that all of the supply chain in its shrimp business was free from illegal labour.

The move is part of its attempt to assure clients that the food giant does not use fishmeal made by slave labour.

Last year, the United States downgraded Thailand to the lowest "Tier 3" status in the world's worst centers of human trafficking. The downgrade prompted some clients to suspend orders with CPF.

"The company wants to assure that our fishmeal supply chain is free from illegal labour," Kosit Lohawatanakul, senior executive vice president for CPF's overseas trading unit said in a statement.

The company, one of the world's leading integrated shrimp farmers, does not own a fishing vessel and is not fishmeal producer. The company buys fishmeal from 30 suppliers with 380 fishing boats, down from 50 suppliers in the previous years, the statement said.

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AU: Barriers to Asian trade costs billions

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Horticultural exporters say they're being locked out of billions of dollars of trade in Asia and the Pacific export markets.

Australia's domestic fruit and vegetable market is oversupplied, and there is a growing list of Asian countries that have stopped importing because of pests and diseases.

Michelle Christoe of the Australian Horticulture Exporters Association refers to technical barriers to trade, like quarantine inspections and difficulty accessing ports or storage, that cost all fresh produce between $5-$7 billion, including horticulture.

The Australian citrus growers appear to have defied the trend, accessing a Chinese market that only a few years ago took no oranges, to last year buying $30 million worth.

Australia's largest blueberry producer Costa said it was unclear how the Department of Agriculture established its priorities.

U.S. completes pest risk analysis for fresh Chilean cranberry imports

In a statement published on the U.S. Government’s Federal Register, APHIS said it had determined the application of one or more designated phytosanitary measures would be sufficient to mitigate the risks of introducing or disseminating plant pests or noxious weeds via the import of fresh cranberries from Chile.

The entity said the cranberries would have to be imported as commercial consignments only, with each consignment accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued by Chilean authorities, and each consignment would be subject to inspection upon arrival at U.S. ports of entry.

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Man faces $74,500 fine after allegedly trying to hide banana plants

Updated March 17, 2015 20:27:39

A man has been charged with trying to hide plants due to be destroyed as part of measures to control banana freckle disease the Northern Territory's Primary Industry Minister says.

Willem Westra van Holthe said the man has been charged with an offence that may result in a $74,500 fine.

Banana plants across much of the Top End must be destroyed by the end of April as part of the NT Government's banana freckle eradication program.

Mr Westra van Holthe said the program was the largest response to a plant disease in Australia's history.

"We've had 37,000 properties across the Territory as a part of this...," he said.

He said while most property owners have complied with the program, some have not.

"The ones who don't want to cooperate for the sake of just a few banana plants in their backyard are going to cause, or have the potential to cause, enormous damage to the future of the banana industry we have here in the Northern Territory," he said.

But it is not only the Territory's banana growers who are under pressure from disease.

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