Government

Danish Pig Industry Adapting to New Challenges - ThePigSite.com

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DENMARK - With the Danish pig industry focused almost entirely on exports, its strategies undoubtedly affect other countries, including the UK – the largest importer of Danish bacon.

For the first ten months of 2014, Denmark’s pork production decreased but both pork and live pig exports increased. The latter, in particular continues to present a challenge for parts of the Danish industry, while price, disease, environmental and animal welfare pressures are also prominent.

Improved breeding success, achieved by industry-wide initiatives and research investment, has kept Danish pig producers at the top of the EU productivity list, weaning 30 pigs per sow in 2013 for the first time. The cost of production is among the lowest in the EU, at €1.68 per kg in 2013.

As a result, Danish piglet production has increased steadily over the years. Yet ever increasing weaner exports are risking the future of finishers, abattoirs and processing stakeholders.

As a result, Danish piglet production has increased steadily over the years. Yet ever increasing weaner exports are risking the future of finishers, abattoirs and processing stakeholders.

Asia embargo over avian flu could affect Pacific commissaries - Stars and Stripes

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WASHINGTON — An avian flu outbreak in the United States might cause shortages of chicken and other poultry at base commissaries in Japan and South Korea, the Defense Commissary Agency said this week.

Embargoes in those countries designed to stop the spread of the disease are holding up U.S. shipments of chicken, turkey, eggs and related products such as pot pies, lunch meat, hotdogs and egg rolls, according to the agency. Eleven commissaries in South Korea and 14 stores on mainland Japan and Okinawa are affected.

Three outbreaks of the disease have occurred among birds in Washington state since last month and have triggered concerns among the poultry industry there and nations in Asia who consume the meat, according to media reports.

“We are using various alternatives to provide some poultry products on our shelves in South Korea and Japan,” said Joseph Jeu, director and CEO of DeCA. “However, because these are limited interim solutions that may not stock our shelves fully, our patrons may experience shortages of certain poultry items.”

Millions of birds killed in Taiwan to thwart bird flu - Washington Post

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- Officials in Taiwan have slaughtered more than 1.3 million birds in an attempt to halt the spread of various strains of bird flu that have swept across the island. ( )

- Officials in Taiwan have slaughtered more than 1.3 million birds in an attempt to halt the spread of various strains of bird flu that have swept across the island. ( )

Concern Over 'Incurable” Sheep Virus - TheSheepSite

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UK, SCOTLAND – A warning has been sent out advising farmers to check animals appearing to have lost condition this winter for untreatable viral disease Meadi Visna (MV).

Disease screening has found a “worrying number” of infections in the UK, suggesting the virus is spreading through the industry, says Scotland’s Rural College.

Out of 31 tested flocks, 23 per cent – seven farms – had the disease, which causes clinical signs of pneumonia. MV is difficult to diagnose and has no cure or vaccine.

“Farmers have started to heed our previous warnings about the disease,” said St Boswells based SRUC Veterinary investigation officer Lynn Gibson.

“Commercial flocks from throughout the UK have taken the opportunity to screen their animals using the MV diagnostic test package.”

From the Icelandic for ill-thrift, Maedi Visna is caused by a retrovirus, brought into the UK via imported animals and leads to poor body condition, fertility problems, increased mastitis; smaller and weaker lambs and higher mortality.

Swine flu spreads to Telangana, Andhra Pradesh districts - Times of India

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HYDERABAD: Health authorities on Wednesday said the swine flu virus was now spreading to the interiors of Telangana and Andhra Pradesh even as Hyderabad recorded 22 positive cases and four more deaths as toll from the disease mounted to 17 in January.

What is worrying health experts and activists is that the H1N1 virus is no longer confined to Hyderabad city only.

Authorities say there is now strong evidence suggesting that the swine flu virus has spread its tentacles far and wide in rural areas of Telangana and Andhra Pradesh.

For instance, between January 23 and 27, 19 swine flu cases, including a few deaths, were reported from Mahbubnagar (8), Karimnagar (2), Warangal (3), Medak (2), Adilabad (1) and Nalgonda (3) in Telangana.

In the corresponding period in AP, nine swine flu cases were reported from West Godavari (3), Guntur (2), Krishna (1), Kurnool (1), Kadapa (1), Anantapur (1) and Chittoor (1).

So, are infected swine flu patients from Hyderabad carrying the virus to Telangana and AP districts? The health officials in Telangana think so, but the opinion from their AP counterparts remains divided on this front.

FEATURE-Road-kill deer get mulched as US states turn to composting - Reuters

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WINDSOR, Va. Jan 29 (Reuters) - For years, Jimmy White woke up worrying about road-kill.

An official with the Virginia highway system, White's responsibilities included ensuring that thousands of deer and other animals hit by cars were collected, a process that cost the state some $4.1 million per year.

But roadside burial is increasingly not an option because of underground cables, pipes and other infrastructure near highways, while landfills charge fees and a decline in the U.S. rendering industry has removed another disposal outlet. Dragging the carcasses into nearby bushes or dropping them into pits can pollute groundwater, said Jean Bonhotal, director of the Waste Management Institute at New York's Cornell University.

Today, White rests easier thanks to a new facility in the southeastern Virginia town of Windsor that takes some of the 10,000 to 15,000 animals, mostly whitetail deer, killed by cars each year, piles them under sawdust and turns the remains into landscaping material for roadsides.

New Jersey Hatcheries Adjust Stocking Plans to Fight Die-offs - OutdoorHub

The New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife will be stocking some 570,000 rainbow trout across state waters for the spring fishing season, yet anglers will notice something different about them this year. Due to a large die-off last year from bacterial infection, there will be no brown or brook trout stocked. Officials said they intend to abstain from stocking these species for at least several years, until a bacteria-resistant strains of brook and brown trout can be introduced.

“The trout going out from the Pequest Hatchery this spring will be completely healthy—and big,” said Division of Fish and Wildlife Director David Chanda. “The only difference is that we will be stocking solely rainbow trout, a much heartier, disease-resistant species which has not been exposed to the bacteria that causes furunculosis.”

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Sixty thousand fish killed as pollution hits a five mile stretch of the Grand Union Canal | Leicester Mercury

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Up to 60,000 fish have died in a massive pollution incident on a five mile stretch of the Grand Union Canal.

They were poisoned by a suspected leak of farm slurry from waterside land somewhere between Kilby Bridge and Kibworth.

But action by the Canal and River Trust and the Environment Agency and Natural England has saved more than 100,000 fish.

They were alerted nearly four weeks ago after large numbers of dead fish were seen floating in the water.

They closed the polluted section of the canal and started pumping air into the water.

They removed surviving fish northwards along the canal towards Bumblebee Lock, near Kilby Bridge.

A spokeswoman for the Canal and River Trust said: “In total we think about 50 to 60,000 fish died.

“ Thankfully we did manage to save more fish that we think have died. The numbers for this are in the region of about 100,000 fish.”

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Illegal shrimp ponds destroyed in Bharuch - The Indian Express

The state government ran JCBs over the illegal shrimp farms in Aliya Bet area of Hansot taluka in the coastal district of Bharuch on Tuesday afternoon. It was said to be the root of the communal riot on January 14, that claimed three lives.

Following the government’s order, the Bharuch district administration pressed four machines into action burying four ponds by evening and seizing the shrimps.

On January 14, marking Makar Sankranti, clashes broke out in Ambheta and Hansot villages of Hansot taluka, apparently after a fight over kite catching, which ended in the killings of two Hindus and a Muslim. Five days after the deaths, the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh owned up the two — Pratik Patel and Sandeep Patel — as their “active members”. The victim from the minority community was tempo driver, identified as Rafik Patel. Many houses, shops and religious places were torched by the mobs and sugarcane crop was set ablaze.

One of the accused named in one of the 10 FIRs lodged at Hansot police station was BJP MLA Ishwar Patel’s brother Vallabh Patel.

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Lessons coordinated plan against caligus - SalmonXpert

Chile: Improve coordination of treatments between business, monitoring the efficiency and sensitivity of drugs, evaluate and develop non-pharmacological alternatives against caligus, were some of the objectives defined by the control plan coordinated caligus 2013-2014.

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Patricio Feest

The exhibition "Preliminary results of the implementation of coordinated control plan caligus 2013-2014" by the veterinarian and technical manager Aquabench, Daniel Woywood, was held on Tuesday January 20 at Hotel Loberías del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco. The presentation was part of the workshop entitled "Caligidosis, current situation and new challenges" by Aquagestión Training.

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