Government

Fuzhou Pingtung River and Long-river current hot weather caused a lot of dead fish doubt _ _ Sina Sina Fujian

Fuzhou Pingtung River and Long-river current hot weather caused a lot of dead fish doubt _ _ Sina Sina Fujian

Fuzhou Pingtung River and Long-river current hot weather caused a lot of dead fish suspected

Sea are net - Strait Metropolis Daily News (Sea are net correspondent Mao Zhaoqing Lin Xinrong) Fuzhou people found yesterday morning, Pingtung river, a lot of dead fish floating in the river Long Feng, whereby there is a problem to worry about river water quality. In this regard, the Drum Tower District environmental monitoring station staff collect water quality testing, the relevant departments will strengthen the position detection.

9 o'clock yesterday morning, a reporter visited the Long Hai Feng Village section Pingtung River, Long Feng River Road section of environmental protection and found that there are more dead fish floating in the water. Liu said rebellion, dead fish floating down yesterday morning from the upstream, river usually have the smell here, she fears river water quality problems, which leads to the death of fish.

 

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Growing footrot outbreak on the Monaro in south-east NSW - ABC Online

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Updated April 30, 2015 11:28:19

Once thought to be under control, the spread of the contagious disease footrot has recently exploded among sheep on the Monaro.

So far 16 properties have been quarantined across Cooma and Bombala in south-east New South Wales.

Footrot is a contagious bacterial disease that attacks the feet of sheep. In its worst form it can impact on the animal's welfare as well as effect wool growth rates.

In 2009 NSW was declared a protected area for footrot as it was affecting less that 1 per cent of the flock but this year it has flared up on the Monaro.

Bibbenluke farmer John Murdoch was one of the first to have sheep diagnosed with footrot and his property quarantined.

"It was 12 months ago almost to the day and subsequently we were able to trace that from one property back to another property," he said.

"You think it's the end of the world, it knocks you about emotionally. It's a lot of stress.

Shrimpers get crabby about EMS, low prices | Bangkok Post: business

Shrimp farmers are calling for urgent aid measures to ease their plight caused by the double blow of early mortality syndrome (EMS) and falling prices.

Representatives of 3,000 small shrimp farms, hatchery operators, processing factories and related industries led by Banchong Nisapavanich, chairman of the Thai Shrimp Farmers Federation, and Somsak Paneetatyasai, president of the Thai Shrimp Association, filed a request letter yesterday with Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha.

They have asked his administration to help stabilise the local white shrimp or vannamei prices, ease financial liquidity for exporters, tackle the early mortality syndrome, and list shrimp on the national agenda, meaning the industry is worthy of special treatment and care from authorities.

The coalition also called on the government to work out measures to control the appreciation of the baht in order to increase Thai shippers export competitiveness.

Mr Banchong said 80% of the shrimp farmers are small-scale and are being hammered by falling shrimp prices and EMS.

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NS investigation finds farmed fish died because of winter weather, not disease - CTV News

HALIFAX -- An investigation has found that the deaths of salmon and trout at three Nova Scotia aquaculture sites earlier this year were caused by environmental factors, not disease.

Staff at the provincial Fisheries Department say the fish kill was caused by extremely cold temperatures experienced during a particularly harsh winter.

Fisheries Minister Keith Colwell says no significant disease agents were found at any of the sites.

The sites, operated by New Brunswick's Cooke Aquaculture, are at Shelburne Harbour, Jordan Bay and Port Wade.

The company has said it's unclear how many fish died, though it appears the majority of the fish at the three sites survived.

Colwell says financial losses from the fish kill won't be covered by the province.

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Fonterra cuts dairy payout forecast

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The cut comes after a 23 per cent fall in the prices for dairy products since February

FONTERRA has cut its forecast payout to farmers by NZ20c (19.5c), blaming volatile global commodity prices and an over-supply in international markets.

The world's biggest dairy exporter has reduced its forecast farmgate milk price to $NZ4.50 per kilogram of milk solids, it said.

It said the cut comes after a 23 per cent fall in the prices for dairy products since February.

"We have confidence in the long-term fundamentals of international dairy demand, however the market has not yet rebalanced," chairman John Wilson said.

"This reduction will impact cash flows for our farmers, who will need to continue exercising caution with on-farm budgets."

The reduced payout follows rival Westland Milk Products, which on Wednesday cut its forecast to between $NZ4.90 and $NZ5.10/kgMS from a previous forecast of $NZ5 to $NZ5.40/kgMS.

 

Live ex damages reputation: NZ

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NEW Zealand's reputation is too important to allow the export of live sheep for slaughter, say NZ farming industry leaders.

In 2003 the NZ Labour government banned the export of live sheep after a disastrous shipment went wrong and 4000 sheep died en route to Saudi Arabia.

Prime Minister John Key is in Saudi Arabia to kickstart stalled negotiations for a free trade deal between New Zealand and the Gulf states.

Resistance from Saudi Arabia has been a stumbling block. The negotiations were almost complete in 2009, but an influential Saudi investor lost cash because of New Zealand's ban on live sheep imports, and the Saudis held a grudge.

Key said: "There were concerns about a Saudi investor and the way he was treated in New Zealand, that was one issue".

"It was a guy who invested decades and decades ago and wasn't sure he'd been properly treated, but that situation has been resolved."

But meat industry leaders said New Zealand had too much to lose by allowing the resumption of the live sheep trade.

Horse Meat Scandal Arrests Raise New Concerns - 29 April 2015

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Over the last week, the horse meat scandal that rocked Europe two years ago took a new twist when 26 arrests have been made and €37,000 have been seized in an international raid against horse meat fraud across the EU. The action by the coordination centre run by the European Union's Judicial Cooperation Unit, Eurojust, and led by the French Desk succeeded in stopping an organised criminal network involved in trade in illegal horse meat. 

IN this latest incident, police and judicial authorities from France, Belgium, Germany, Ireland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and the UK were involved in the common action day, including, among others, 100 officers of the Gendarmerie Nationale of France, three of whom were present in Belgium, 100 officers from the Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority, and Belgian officers, some of whom were present in France, Luxembourg and Germany. More than 200 horses will be examined by veterinary services and dozens of searches of commercial and private premises were carried out in the joint action. 

 

 

Extended deadline for risk of the spread of Gyrodactylus salaris in northern Scandinavia - Mattilsynet

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Extended deadline for risk of the spread of Gyrodactylus salaris in northern Scandinavia - Mattilsynet

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Alltech, Ridley Agree Merger

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NORTH AMERICA - A merger of two global livestock feed companies has been agreed.

Alltech and Ridley Inc. announced that they have entered into a plan of arrangement agreement under which Alltech will acquire 100 per cent of the outstanding stock of Ridley, one of the leading commercial animal nutrition companies in North America.

The combined company will have a presence in over 128 countries and 4,200 employees worldwide.

Although the move is still waiting on approval by shareholders, regulatory review and other customary closing conditions, the boards of directors of both companies have unanimously approved the merger.

The remaining Ridley shares were purchased by Alltech for C$40.75 per share, and the total amount payable to Ridley shareholders is approximately C$521 million.

The price of C$40.75 per share represents a premium of approximately 23 per cent to the 20-day volume weighted average price of Ridley’s common shares on the TSX as of 22 April 2015. The closing price of the Ridley shares on the TSX on 22 April 2015 was C$33.94.

The transaction is expected to close by the end of the second quarter.

Red Tape Removal Needed for Trade Talks Success

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EU - During the ninth round of negotiations between the US and EU on a potential free trade agreement, european agricultural organisation Copa-Cogeca has said that red tape and technical barriers must be removed if the talks are to be successful.

Speaking at the stakeholders forum during the talks, Copa-Cogeca Commodities and Trade Director Arnaud Petit warned of the adminstrative problems for exporting produce to the US, such as costly labelling rules.

“For example, EU dairy producers face huge obstacles when trying to market Grade A milk products in the US. EU cheeses are denied access to the US market because the label fails to use hairline, bars and bold type in an appropriate format.

"Hard cheeses, semi-soft cheeses and soft ripened cheeses have to wait 60 days before circulating on the US market. The main issue here appears to be the testing methods which are not the same on both sides of the Atlantic.

"In the fruit and vegetables sector, a limited number of products are allowed to enter the US market after a pre-clearance procedure, such as apples and pears.

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