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LUMPY SKIN DISEASE - EUROPE (03): BOVINE, DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS, VACCINATION - ProMED Digest, Vol 58, Issue 91

Date: Thu 20 Apr 2017
Source: European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) press release [edited]
<http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/press/news/170420>

The mass vaccination of cattle implemented in south-eastern Europe
successfully contained the outbreaks of lumpy skin disease in the
region in 2015-16. This is the main conclusion of an epidemiological
analysis carried out by EFSA in cooperation with countries affected by
the disease and those at risk.

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Victoria's biosecurity to get $44.4 million fillip - Sheep Central

VICTORIAN government support for the mandatory electronic tagging in sheep and goats will continue as part of a $44.4 million two-year commitment to biosecurity included in Victoria’s 2017-18 budget.

The Andrews Labor Government said the funds will support Agriculture Victoria to secure overseas market access for farmers and continue to protect our state from invasive pests and diseases.

This will maintain the state’s crucial agricultural biosecurity, protecting access to international markets and supporting regional jobs, the State Government said today.

An additional $19.2 million over four years will go towards a ten-year national plan to eradicate the invasive Red Imported Fire Ant.

The ant can cause significant damage, placing the health of livestock, farm workers and the environment at risk. It was first detected in Brisbane in 2001.

The government said the funding reflected its determination to rebuild Victoria’s agricultural bio-security system, which had been drastically undermined by ongoing cuts under the former Liberal-National Government.

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KOREA: shrimp import measures strengthened

The virus is strengthening quarantine (Sejong = Focus News) deadly white scab on the importation of frozen, chilled shrimp, like foot-and-mouth disease and avian influenza (AI). The virus is also highly infectious particles concerned moving in as sokedo cold frozen shrimp live, warehousing process, the domestic shrimp.

From April 9 to 20, coming According to the National Fisheries Products Quality Management Service, Ministry of Maritime Affairs will also extend the quarantine of frozen, chilled shrimp imports as well as live shrimp.

Avoid infectious disease quarantine the virus species and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV), infectious muscle necrosis virus (IMNV), Taura Syndrome Virus (TSV), the white spot virus (WSSV), yellow head disease virus, etc. (YHV).

In the meantime, shrimp epidemic and quarantine inspection has been carried out only on imported live. However, the white spot virus white leg shrimp caught in giving a shock when the distribution is known to the fact that the domestic dining table.

 

 

 

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Australia's biosecurity threatened by staff cuts and poor planning

White spot in prawns the latest in biosecurity failures highlighting impact of cuts to staff, research

By Sarina Locke

Posted February 20, 2017 12:36:39

After a huge increase in exotic pests and diseases, Australian agriculture and environmentalists are demanding more focus on biosecurity.

The past five years of failures ranges from the attacking red fire ants, banana diseases, myrtle rust and a melon disease to an exotic disease in Queensland's prawn farms.

Global movement of goods and people is partly to blame, but the blame is also being levelled at reduced spending and staff cutbacks by state and federal governments.

White spot destroys prawn farms

It has taken less than three months for white spot disease to infect all seven prawn farms on the Logan River in Queensland, between Brisbane and the Gold Coast.

A devastated Serena Zipf watched authorities sterilise her the ponds with chlorine.

"What happens after this is that we have to assess what future we have, if any, in this industry," she said.

While white spot is harmless to people, it has now wiped out all prawn farms in south-east Queensland — the farms have a combined sale value of $25 million.

The area supplies a third of Australia's farmed prawns.

Authorities have traced the disease back to imported frozen Asian prawns.

Despite that, it took two months from the first outbreak in November for the Federal Government to ban imports of these prawns.

That angered the industry, which said it had warned authorities about the risk for decades.

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USDA Calls Scientist Gag Order a "Misunderstanding"

Hours after the news broke that the U.S. Department of Agriculture e-mailed its scientists ordering them not to speak to the press, and informing them that there would be an immediate halt on press releases, the USDA insisted it isn’t really suppressing its researchers’ communications with the public—because they can still publish peer-reviewed journal articles or give media interviews if the agency approves them.

“What happened yesterday was a misunderstanding,” Christopher Bentley, director of communications for the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS), told Scientific American Wednesday. He said a second e-mail had been issued late Tuesday to clear things up about the initial message sent earlier that day. “The announcement that our administrator sent to staff last night was less a rescinding of anything than it was a clarification,” Bentley said. He also played down the curbs on press releases and public statements, explaining, “This is what has happened at the transition of every administration…it’s just a pause.”

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Agriculture Department lifts USDA gag order after public outcry

Under the rule, those public-facing documents would have included "news releases, photos, fact sheets, news feeds, and social media content." This gag order operated in the same vein as Trump's attempts to silence the EPA, National Park Service and Department of Transportation and Department of Health and Human Services. However, after a day of strident and vocal backlash against the rule from both the scientific community and American public, the department relented.

As Chavonda Jacobs-Young, administrator the USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS), told Buzzfeed the order -- which was originally written by Sharon Drumm, chief of staff at ARS -- should never have been sent in the first place because it was not properly vetted by USDA leadership. "The ARS guidance was not reviewed by me," Michael Young, the acting deputy administrator of USDA, told the Washington Post. "I would not have put that kind of guidance out."

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USDA Ordered to Stop Talking to Public

Folks at the United States Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service received an email Monday morning from their chief of staff telling them not to talk to the public about their work.

The ARS solves agricultural problems, like balancing fertilizer and water use, developing healthier plants, and protecting the beloved honeybees. The email seems to join other attempts by the Trump administration to stifle executive agency communications.

BuzzFeed, which received the email communication from an unnamed source, reports:

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USDA expands Florida quarantine for citrus black spot - The Packer

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has expanded quarantine areas in Florida due to the further detection of citrus black spot.

APHIS is adding 11 sections in Collier County and 75 sections in Hendry County. These actions are in direct response to the surveys conducted by APHIS and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry.

This is an update on previous quarantine areas, which also include parts of Lee and Polk counties, as Florida first discovered citrus black spot in 2010. Since then, APHIS has taken steps to limit its spread, as “fresh citrus fruit that is moved interstate from the (citrus black spot) quarantine areas must be packed in commercial citrus packinghouses operating under a compliance agreement with APHIS and the fruit must be processed using APHIS-approved methods,” according to a November update to the quarantine order.

“APHIS is applying safeguarding measures and restrictions on the interstate movement or entry into foreign trade of regulated articles from the quarantine,” APHIS said in the update.

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Florida: APHIS expands citrus black spot quarantine zone

The U.S. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has broadened the geographical area for citrus black spot quarantine (CBS) in two Florida counties that have hosted the disease since 2010.

Following surveys conducted by APHIS and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry (DPI), the decision has been made to add 11 sections to Collier County and 75 sections in Hendry County for the state’s quarantine area.

“These new sections in Collier and Hendry Counties are near areas that have previously been found positive for CBS,” APHIS said in an update.

The total quarantine zone also includes parts of Lee and Polk Counties.

“APHIS is applying safeguarding measures and restrictions on the interstate movement or entry into foreign trade of regulated articles from the quarantine. Regulated articles from quarantine areas are subject to all interstate movement conditions outlined in a Federal Order that was issued on March 16, 2012,” APHIS said.

 

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Xylella, the entomologist PF Roversi: "Cold will help fight against pathogenic" - TagPress.it

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According to the entomologist the cold will kill the vector of Xylella, the sputacchina. also beneficial for viticulture, as it would cut down the navicular.

The extraordinary cold wave that is hitting the central and southern regions these days could facilitate the fight against Xylella fastidiosa, the bacteria considered (but the thesis is debated) the primary agent in the complex of the rapid desiccation of the olive, which for some years He is hitting the trees of Salento.

Is convinced the entomologist Pio Federico Roversi, a researcher at the Research Center of Defense Create (Council for Agricultural Research), the same institution where I work Dr. Marco Scortichini, who for nearly two years leading the testing of a cure for the olive trees affected by desiccation, the results are very encouraging.

This cold does not kill the pathogen, but the insect which is considered carrier of Xylella, known as sputacchina.

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