Industry

Ecuador does not lower our guard in the fight against diseases that affect shrimp - Last minute - Ipac. Magazine aquaculture

The National Fisheries Institute (INP) under the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Aquaculture and Fisheries (MAGAP) ratified a few weeks that is ruled out the presence of Early Mortality Syndrome (EMS for its acronym in English) in the Ecuadorian shrimp ago. Did after in early June will monitor six different samples of shrimp in shrimp farms in the area of ​​Pedernales, Manabi province, which had recorded mortalities of this crustacean. The results consisted that this death was not due to the presence of the EMS, "thus keeping the country free of this virus." INP remember the worldwide latent cases of positive as white spot virus (WSSV), yellow head (YHV), hypodermic infectious hematopoietic necrosis and (IHHNV), Taura syndrome (TSV-), IMN (IMNV) are. Against this background, the National Fisheries Institute, stresses that, periodically, is studying the "Laboratory testing of products for use in aquaculture" (LAB-EPA), "the only laboratory in South America that has the IQ Kit TM REAL AHPND / EMS Toxin 1 in real time. "

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“State of calamity” emergency declared in Italian olive oil heartland

Funding of €11 million has been offered to growers in Italy as they battle Xylella fastidiosa, a leaf scorch labeled by some as the ‘olive ebola’ which is also a threat to other fruit crops in Europe including citrus fruit and grapes.

Agriculture Minister Maurizio Martina declared a state of calamity for the disease emergency yesterday, covering the provinces of Lecce and Brindisi on the southeastern peninsula of Salento.

The announcement was made during a visit to the region with EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, Vytenis Andriukaitis. The EU has previously expressed its concerns about the disease’s spread in the continent. In April, Xylella was also found in a coffee plant at a wholesale market outside Paris, prompting fears about its threat to the nation’s vineyards.

 

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GM salmon susceptible to disease, slow growth, GMO scientists alarmed that biotech is unpredictable | Time For Truth – News You Should Have Read And Should Be Reading

Canadian government documents recently obtained as part of a lawsuit meant to block the production of genetically modified (GM) salmon show that, contrary to claims made by producer AquaBounty Technologies, the GM salmon actually grow more slowly and are more prone to disease than non-GM farmed salmon.

The documents raise questions about the viability and safety of the fish that have not been considered by the FDA as it ponders whether to approve the fish for human consumption.

“Major grocery chains, consumers and salmon producers are all rejecting genetically engineered salmon,” said Dana Perls, food and technology campaigner for Friends of the Earth. “This new assessment adds to the body of science showing that this genetically engineered fish doesn’t offer any benefit to aquaculture, has unique health problems and presents environmental risks. Why is the FDA continuing to spend scarce tax-payer dollars reviewing this fish that offers all risk and no reward?”

Read the Full Article: Source – Natural News

Time For Truth: (Natural News) – GM salmon susceptible to disease, slow growth,

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Save the Guac!

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A University of Florida report caused us to emphasize our Save the Guac campaign when it predicted increasing prices for Florida avocados this season. The increase is expected to be short-term. It is the result of the laurel wilt pathogen spread by the invasive redbay ambrosia beetle is killing trees and threatening Florida’s $100 million avocado industry. Florida produces about 12 percent of U.S. avocados, mainly in Miami-Dade County.

 

 

SWD Trap Network Update (July 6th - July 15th) - FruitEDGE

Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) trap catch really increased this past week, in ALL small fruit that are becoming attractive for egg-lay in the Metro Area. Trap catch exceeded 80/trap in summer and fall raspberries, and trap catch was also high for grapes and blueberry. The recent excessive heat (>85F) may help suppress egg-lay to some extent, but these adult numbers are significant and clearly high risk for infestations.

Growers of susceptible fruit are encouraged to monitor their fields regularly to confirm the presence of SWD before considering chemical management options. Those with increasing trap catch and susceptible fruit should initiate chemical control now to minimize maggot infestations and economic losses.

The Department of Entomology and the MN IPM Program (UMN Extension), in collaboration with the MDA, are monitoring multiple farm locations in MN and will be posting regular updates regarding SWD phenology and activity on the UMN FruitEdge website, see: http://www.fruitedge.umn.edu/2015-swd-trap-catch/

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Cassava mealybug awareness campaign launched in Vietnam

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A campaign to raise awareness about the destructive cassava mealybug has been launched in Phu Yen Province, Vietnam. Organized by the local Plant Protection Sub-Department (PPSD) and the national Agricultural Extension Center, the launch was attended by representatives from departments of Agriculture and Rural Development, Extension and Plant Protection, the Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), farmers, cassava factory staff and the media.

The main purpose of the event was to raise awareness about cassava mealybug – a new invasive pest which is destroying more than 212 ha of cassava in the province – and to inform farmers and cassava factory representatives about proper ways of controlling mealybug infestations.

Many interventions were introduced by experts from various national institutions, and Dr. Ignazio Graziosi, a CIAT Asia research fellow, gave a presentation about the effect of A. lopezi, a parasitic wasps which attacks cassava mealybugs and has helped save cassava crops in many countries in Southeast Asia.

All-consuming banana fungus advancing

One of the most popular fruit varieties in the world, the bananas, is threatened with extinction. The Panama Disease Tropical Race 4 (TR4) has spread farther across the world in recent months, and it seems a matter of time for the fungus to reach Latin America. History has shown that the fungus poses a serious threat to the banana. According to estimates, 85 percent of the global volume of bananas is threatened by TR4.

Cavendish survived Type 1

The main export markets for bananas worldwide are the US and Europe. FAO figures show that North America and the EU import 31 and 28 percent of bananas respectively. The fear exists that the fungus will have similar consequences for the banana production as Panama Disease Race 1, which left its mark in Latin America halfway through the last century, decimating the banana production. The Gros Michel, the most carried variety in those years, was virtually wiped out by the fungus.

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Deadly skin disease hits salmon stocks in Devon river - Western Morning News

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The Environment Agency has called on fishermen to down rods and stow nets after a deadly disease hit salmon stocks in a Devon river.

Wild salmon in the River Dart have been hit by an outbreak of ulcerative dermal necrosis (UDN), a skin condition which decimated the species in the 1970s.

UDN is a naturally occurring dermatological disease that leaves salmon with lesions, which can become infected.

It is not harmful to humans.

Phillip Prowse, honorary secretary of the Dart Anglers Association, said rod-and-line fishermen had voluntarily stopped catching the species.

M Prowse said the bulk of fish caught were released anyway with only 30 recorded as being killed by members over ten years.

“It has curtailed rod and line fishing – a lot of people have stopped because there is disease and they don’t want to put the fish through any more stress,” he added.

“When there is disease about fish don’t tend to not to take a fly so it tough to catch them.

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