Industry

Abandoned Californian citrus groves destroyed

Officials in San Bernardino County are bulldozing dead, dying or abandoned citrus trees as they pose a serious threat to nearby commercial citrus groves, due to the Asian citrus psyllid. The county warned owners about the threat of infestations in December, but after no response, took action.

The trees were removed under the authority of the state Food and Agricultural Code, which allows neglected or abandoned orchards that harbor agricultural pests and diseases to be declared a public nuisance and removed at the owner's expense.

With hundreds of citrus acres abandoned statewide, Alyssa Houtby of California Citrus Mutual said, "We've been working on this issue extensively the last few weeks. Abandoned orchards are a serious concern as we try to fight against the Asian citrus psyllid."

Although state statute provides authority for county officials to act when there are clear pest and disease threats to agriculture, some counties have not needed to use the authority in the recent past and have been reluctant to take action, she said.

"Really, we need growers—sometimes residential property owners—to voluntarily remove abandoned orchards," she said.

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Chinese-Scottish discovery of potato blight's ‘Achilles heel’

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Joint research between scientists at the University of Dundee and James Hutton Institute in Scotland, and colleagues at Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, and Heilongjiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin, has potentially uncovered an Achilles’ heel in the organism which causes potato blight.

The scientists have been studying ways to prevent the disease, which is a global problem with associated costs estimated at $6billion around the world every year.

Blight was the cause of the infamous Irish potato famine in the nineteenth century and remains a huge problem around the world, particularly as more countries turn to potato as a major staple crop and ramp up production. China is now the world’s major producer of potatoes.

The scientists have identified a potato enzyme that, if it were removed, could prevent the disease from taking hold.

US (CA): Oakdale citrus quarantine detailed

After the discovery of an Asian citrus psyllid back in December, at a home west of the Oakdale Rodeo Grounds, the state has released a map detailing the new quarantine zone. The psyllid is a major threat to backyard fruit in the city and also to commercial groves elsewhere.

The department is urging people with orange, grapefruit, lemon and other citrus trees not to transport fruit outside the boundary.

The Oakdale-area quarantine follows one placed in November on a 101-square-mile area from Keyes to north Merced County. This action has now been taken in all or part of 21 California counties.

Milton O’Haire, agricultural commissioner for Stanislaus County, said Friday 29 January that pesticide spraying was done within 100 meters of the Oakdale find after residents were notified. His staff has increased the number of psyllid traps in the zone, but no more have been found.

The disease has done about $1.3 billion in damage to Florida groves and is a major concern in California citrus regions, mainly from Madera to Kern counties and in Southern California. Citrus is not a major crop in the Northern San Joaquin Valley, but backyard trees are common.

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

he recent floods in the Nellore district of Andhra Pradesh and an outbreak of a fungal disease on shrimps may hit revenue of aquaculture companies and exports for the next fiscal year ending March 31,

he recent floods in the Nellore district of Andhra Pradesh and an outbreak of a fungal disease on shrimps may hit revenue of aquaculture companies and exports for the next fiscal year ending March 31, 2017, officials say.

Enterocytozoon Hepatopenaei (EHP), a microsporidia disease in India may have impact on the shrimp production and performance of aquaculture companies including Chennai headquartered Waterbase Ltd. Promoted by the Karam Chand Thapar Group, Waterbase is a leading manufacturer of high quality shrimp feed.

Talking to The Hindu, Waterbase CEO Ramakant V. Akula said: “We had a good run for four to five years. But due to the recent outbreak of EHP fungi and floods, Indian shrimp exports will also be adversely impacted. Currently, we are having discussions with international experts and domestic research institutes on how to control EHP fungi in India.”

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Shrimp industry faces tough time | Deccan Chronicle

CHENNAI: After a year’s golden run, shrimp industry is going through tough times with the outbreak of Enterocytozoon Hepatopenaei (EHP), a microsporidian parasite that hampers the growth of farmed shrimp. The Coastal Aquaculture Authority (CAA) fears there would be a production loss of 20% this fiscal year ending March 31, 2016. Not just the new disease, the recent unprecedented rain has also taken a heavy toll with several shrimp ponds across Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh recording total damage.

A senior official in CAA told Deccan Chronicle that rough estimates confirm there would be at least a 20 per cent production loss. From 2008-09, there has been a steady increase in shrimp production and exports in India. Last fiscal year, India exported an incredible 3,57,505 tonnes netting Rs 22468.12 crore, thereby emerging as the leading exporter in the world. However, things would drastically change, if proper measures are not initiated to mitigate the disease spread.

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Microbial community of Pacific abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) juveniles during a disease outbreak in South China - Shi - 2015 - Aquaculture Research - Wiley Online Library

Microbial community of Pacific abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) juveniles during a disease outbreak in South China - Shi - 2015 - Aquaculture Research - Wiley Online Library

Shi, L.-y., Liang, S., Luo, X., Ke, C.-h. and Zhao, J. (2015), Microbial community of Pacific abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) juveniles during a disease outbreak in South China. Aquaculture Research. doi: 10.1111/are.12950

*Correspondence: J Zhao, College of Ocean and Earth Science of Xiamen University, Xiangan District, Zhoulongquan Building, Xiamen 361102, China. E-mail: sunnyzhaoj@xmu.edu.cn

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Floods, EHP to hit India aquaculture sector in 2015-16

The recent floods in the Nellore district of Andhra Pradesh, and an outbreak of a fungal disease on shrimp, may hit revenue of aquaculture companies and exports for the next fiscal year ending March 31, 2017, The Hindu reports.

Enterocytozoon Hepatopenaei (EHP), a microsporidia disease currently present in India, may have impact on the shrimp production and performance of aquaculture companies, officials said, including Chennai headquartered Waterbase.

“We had a good run for four to five years. But due to the recent outbreak of EHP fungi and floods, Indian shrimp exports will also be adversely impacted. Currently, we are having discussions with international experts and domestic research institutes on how to control EHP fungi in India," said Waterbase CEO Ramakant V. Akula.

Untill recently, Indian aquaculture firms were only discussing early mortality syndrome. Now, they have turned their focus on tackling EHP.

For the last three years, both these diseases have been affecting shrimp production in Thailand, Vietnam, Mexico and China.

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Managing a real prick of a weed - RuralNewsGroup

Mount Beautiful vineyard manager Finn Grieve, right, talks to farmer John Mason about the Chilean needle grass behind him.

As far as farming nightmares go, finding an invasive biosecurity pest on your farm ranks up there with the worst of them.

And for many farmers nationwide that nightmare is real when they discover Chilean needle grass on their farm.

The prickly pest is an arable equivalent of the Terminator of cinema fame. It's hard to kill, resistant to temperature change and difficult to identify – unless it is in seed. It can lie dormant in the soil for at least 10 years ready to surface when conditions are ripe.

The weed has infested at least 110 sites in Hawkes Bay and a further 110 sites in Marlborough, but is only a recent invader in Canterbury with only 14 sites discovered.

The regional council, Environment Canterbury, has joined forces with farmers to battle the pest in the hope of containing it.

ECan principal biosecurity advisor Laurence Smith hosted a field day for interested parties last week at the Cheviot school hall. A morning of presentations was followed by a visit to two sites where Chilean needle grass has been discovered, showing the success of containment efforts.

Containment is the key for the 160ha Mount Beautiful vineyard, nestled in the rolling hills north of Cheviot, where Chilean needle grass was discovered in 2008. Since then the vineyard has effectively become an island as they have implemented extensive biosecurity protocols to keep the pest at bay.

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

EU agrees on provisional plant protection deal

Members of European Parliament (MEPs) have informally agreed on new rules to curb the influx of pests in the European Union (EU) as part of legislative reform on plant health.

A package of measures include new regulations on how to stop the spread of plant diseases such as Xylella fastidiosa, a bacterium devastating some olive orchards in Italy’s key growing regions and with outbreaks on the French island of Corsica.

“Plant health is an important issue for the whole of Europe,” says rapporteur Anthea McIntyre, who headed Parliament’s negotiating team.

“I am very pleased that Parliament, together with member states, has agreed measures to protect our countries from the ravages of pests and diseases which can potentially destroy whole species of trees, plants and plant products.”

The provisional deal also introduced preventive measures for imported plants and fast-response mechanisms for high-risk ones.

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

The Seafood Importers' Association says it's 'very unlikely' prawns peeled by slave labour has made its way into Australia

The Seafood Importers' Association says it's 'very unlikely' prawns peeled by slave labour has made its way into Australia - ABC Rural (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Norm Grant from the Australian Seafood Importers' Association says it was surprising to learn product from illegal factories in Thailand had been supplied to one of the world's largest exporters, because previously only product from registered and inspected peeling houses was allowed into the supply chain.

Seafood importers say it's 'unlikely' prawns processed with slave labour will reach Australian consumers

Updated December 17, 2015 12:41:41

Seafood importers say it's highly unlikely product processed in notorious "prawn peeling sheds" in Thailand have made it onto Australian supermarket shelves.

The Australian Seafood Importers' Association said it was surprising to learn product from illegal factories had been supplied to one of the world's largest exporters, Thai Union, because previously only product from registered and inspected peeling houses was allowed into the export supply chain.

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Industry