Industry News

The EP Agriculture Committee adopted the resolution enhancement controls pests on citrus imports | agrodiariohuelva.es

The Agriculture Committee of the European Parliament adopted a resolution presented by Clara Aguilera rejects the amendments that the European Commission intends to introduce controls on imports of citrus from third countries in the current rules of the EU Plant Health.

"It is essential to equip ourselves with effective for the drama of the Xylella fastidiosa, who lives south of Italy, may not play in the citrus groves of Valencia, Andalusia and other EU territories tools," said Aguilera. "If we have learned that lesson, we can not sit idly by while the EC attempts to relax phytosanitary controls on imported citrus from third countries when your destination industry and not fresh consumption" he added.

The Socialist leader recalled that we are talking about such serious pests such as the Black Spot or Citrus Canker and relax the controls is an unnecessary threat facing some risk of contamination and spread them.

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Xylella fastidiosa found on Spanish cherry trees - Fruitnet

Bacterial plant disease Xylella fastidiosa has been found in Spain for the first time leading to a ban on movement of cherry trees within a 15,000 hectare area.

The disease was found on three cherry trees at a garden centre in Porto Cristo, on the island of Majorca. Three strains of the disease have now been located on hosts in Italy, southern France (including Corsica), Germany and Spain (Majorca), although it is yet to reach the UK.

Xylella has the potential to be a big threat to ornamental and fruit production, according to the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA).

It can be carried by hosts including trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants, including oak, rose and lavender, and is transmitted by insects such as leaf-hoppers.

The bacteria multiply within the xylem and obstruct the flow of water around the plant. In some cases, this causes the leaves to die off, which is a key symptom, but can also be confused with under-watering or autumnal leaf-drop making diagnosis challenging.

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Argentina: 3,200 citrus saplings destroyed to prevent HLB infection

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The National Health Service and Food Quality (Senasa) destroyed 3,200 citrus seedlings in pots to prevent the HLB, a deadly disease of citrus for which there is no cure, from entering Tucuman.
 
The seedlings were destroyed in an area located on Route 305 in the town of Las Mesadas, Burruyacu.
 

Xylella fastidiosa: negative results in Valencia

The Minister of Agriculture, Environment, Climate and Rural Development, Elena Cebrián Change, has informed farmers and nurserymen about the negative results obtained in the search of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa 'in Valencia.

Cebrián unveiled the updated sector available to the conselleria on monitoring the case of Xylella fastidiosa detected in Porto Cristo near Manacor, Balearic Islands during the meeting of the Bureau of Plant Health information.

Caber remember that the camp detected in Baleares, Xylella positive, came from a nursery in Alcanar in the province of Tarragona, which in turn has production plots in the Baix Maestrat.

After knowledge of this case, Cebrián announced additional measures to Contingency Plan against Xylella fastidiosa that counseling itself launched in July this year, through which there have been more than 800 analysis, but recalled that already They are taking steps since last year.

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Missions alert for the detection of plants with HLB | I superfield

The National Health Service and Food Quality (Senasa) continues its preventive actions against Huanglongbing (HLB) in the area of ​​contingency in the province of Misiones.

Under the National Program for Prevention of HLB (PNPHLB), agents Senasa detected a commercial establishment in that province, with citrus plants grown in a nursery without protection against the insect vector, representing a high risk of being affected by the HLB to be located in an area near the border with Paraguay, an area considered high exposure by the presence of the pest in that country.

Also, subsequent monitoring activities determined that the establishment was affected by HLB, as were detected numerous positive plants, so the Senasa established a specific work plan for the eradication of the pest, in accordance with the new regulatory framework established by Law No. 27333.

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Philippines: Import permits cancelled over smuggling

On Tuesday 22 Nov., Agriculture Secretary of the Philippines, Emmanuel F. Piñol, ordered the cancellation of all import permits related to meat and plant products to fight against smuggling done through the “recycling” of such documents.

“I will sign this (special order) within the day,” Piñol told reporters. “The canceled permits, subject to a review involving myself, may be reissued immediately if everything turns out to be in order.”

He said a technical working group has been formed to assess and handle the issuance of new permits.

lampdown was also against traders who bring in goods that were declared as another product of lesser value.

Asked whether this campaign might affect domestic supply and prices, Piñol said there should be no such result. “We are not hindering legal importation, only those shipments that are illegal,” he said.

But he said that once he has signed the order, no shipment would be released until the proper import permits have been reissued.

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New biosecurity strategy for NZ - Fruitnet.com - Fruitnet

New Zealand industry groups have welcomed the launch of a new biosecuity strategy.

Developed by the country’s federal government, the Biosecurity 2025 Direction Statement was unveiled by New Zealand's minister for primary industries, Nathan Guy, at a biosecurity forum in Auckland yesterday (22 November), with approximately 200 primary industry stakeholders in attendance.

Steve Rich, secretariat manager of the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) for Biosecurity Readiness and Response, said the statement would future-proof New Zealand’s biosecurity system for the years to come.

“GIA’s industry partners strongly support the minister for taking the initiative to refresh New Zealand’s biosecurity strategy,” Rich explained. “They have welcomed the opportunity to take part in the process to develop the B2025 Direction Statement, and are committed to participate in its implementation.”

 

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Inconclusive Results Hint at More HLB - AgNet West

The current huanglongbing disease test can produce inconclusive results and California citrus leaders say the industry should assume there are more infections in the state.

The current test for huanglongbing (HLB) disease is to run an Asian citrus psyllid or tree sample through a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) machine. The machine cycles 40 times, and if it can’t find the bacteria associated with HLB, it comes out negative. There is a gray area, however, that can produce inconclusive results. “There are some non-regulatory cycle levels between 33 and 39 with an insect that if the machine fluoresces during those cycles, the regulatory agencies say that isn’t necessarily a positive,” Citrus Integrated Pest Management Specialist Beth Grafton-Cardwell said. “What might be going on is the machine is detecting something that is like the bacteria, or the bacteria amount is so small, it can’t really find it.”

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Researchers warn that HLB could put an end to Spanish citrus

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Ferran Garcia-Marí, researcher at the Agroforestry Institute of the Mediterranean (UPV), believes that control measures need to be enforced to prevent a hypothetical propagation in Spain of Huanglongbing (HLB), or greening disease, the world's most dangerous disease for citrus fruits. "The insect vector has already been detected in Galicia, and if the bacterium reaches Spain, the HLB could put an end to the country's citrus crops, as is already happening in Florida," assures Garcia-Marí.

Citrus producers in Florida have been suffering a severe crisis since the identification, in 2005, of the first case of HLB, a disease that has already killed millions of trees and which has forced growers to redirect a considerable share of their fruit to the production of juices, given their inability to market the oranges, lemons and grapefruits; and all of this just seven years after the vector was first detected.

Bacterial leaf streak part of string of new crop disease IDs - Missouri Farmer Today

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DEKALB, Ill. — A new bacterial corn disease was found in several Midwestern states including Iowa and Illinois this fall. Last year, two new corn diseases appeared in Illinois, making it the first time in four decades for new diseases to be spotted here.

There is still much work to be done to understand the new diseases, to see if they pose a threat to yields and to determine how to best control them economically and effectively.

It’s too early to know if this is a trend, but Illinois, Iowa and Nebraska researches say part of the reason more bacterial corn diseases are being recognized here is because there is better detection technology and people are watching closely.

“Part of it is that we look at crops more closely now. Agronomists and field specialists also look later in the year,” said Russ Higgins, University of Illinois Extension educator based in Shabbona, Ill.

Finding more corn diseases means, in part, “we are doing a good job looking for them,” he said.

Still there isn’t an easy explanation why more diseases are being found.

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