Industry News

Russian wheat aphid threat downgraded after SA crop inspection

Posted June 14, 2016 12:01:38

The national taskforce on managing the Russian wheat aphid arrived in South Australia last week preparing for the worst, but left feeling underwhelmed by the task ahead.

The aphid is an exotic pest first discovered in Tarlee in South Australia in May, and is said to be one of the most destructive cereal pests known to farmers.

It is Australia's first incursion of the pest, which is now endemic across eastern parts of South Australia and western Victoria.

After making the discovery on May 12, local agronomist Andrew Parkinson said the wheat paddock that had been crawling with aphids was now clear of the pest.

"As soon as the relevant authorities got involved, they gave us a recommendation for an insecticide to use, which proved to be very, very effective ... to this point it has been very successful," he said.

The national management group, led Grain Producers Australia chairman Andrew Weidemann, travelled to the centre of the outbreak in South Australia to develop a national strategy to manage the pest.

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The FDA Is Being Sued for Not Protecting Us from Bad Oysters - Munchies_ Food by VICE

When someone is conspicuously absent at work or taking an unusually long time in the restroom, “bad oysters” are often pegged as the culprit. And according to data from the Centers for Disease Control, it’s pretty fair to assume that they might be incidences of illness from the Vibrio vulnificus bacteria— commonly contracted from raw oysters—which increased by 41 percent between 1996 and 2005. In fact, they’ve been at an all-time high over the past few years.

Hell hath no fury on your weekend plans like a bad batch of dollar oysters during Friday happy hour.

But now, the Food and Drug Administration is being sued for failing to protect us hedonistic shellfish-slurpers from ourselves—or more accurately, from the threat of gastrointestinal distress.

Filed by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, the lawsuit alleges that the agency has violated the Food Safety Modernization Act and inadvertently led to the unnecessary deaths of at least 15 people every year by failing to adequately regulate shellfish for raw consumption, according to Food Safety News .

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FDA struggles to pinpoint cause of pet deaths from jerky treats | FiercePharma

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Nine years after launching an investigation into thousands of reports of pets that became sick or died after eating meat jerky treats, the FDA is still unable to pinpoint the exact cause of the problem. The only thing the agency can say for sure is that reports of treat-related illnesses are on the decline: The FDA received just 200 reports between September 2014 and the end of 2015, versus 270 cases between May and September 2014, according to a statement.

Since the FDA launched its investigation in 2007, it has received 5,200 complaints of pet illnesses associated with chicken, duck, or sweet potato jerky treats, the agency says. More than 1,140 dogs have died after eating the treats, most of which were imported from China. The FDA added duck treats to its investigation late in the game because it detected antimicrobial and antiviral residues in one imported product, according to the statement. It also updated an existing import alert to include poultry-based jerky treats.

Calls for Sheep Health Statements use | The Land

New livestock arriving to properties is one of the highest risk activities for introducing disease, pests or parasites into flocks.

Livestock Biosecurity Network national operations manager Sarah-Jane Wilson, is calling on greater use of the Sheep Health Statement (SHS) - a free, easy to use tool available to help manage farm biosecurity risks.

Dr Wilson said when buying or moving sheep, ask the vendor for a completed SHS to assess the risk around Lice, Ovine Brucellosis (OB), Ovine Johnes Disease (OJD), and Footrot.

“By managing your biosecurity decisions at this crucial time you are minimising risk and maximising the opportunity for profitability,” she said.

“These diseases and parasites can have a long and expensive impact on sheep flocks once established.

“When restocking, or accepting agistment animals, flock health history, location, testing previously undertaken and vaccination history are vital pieces of information that savvy buyers will be wanting to know.”

 

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Could Sheep Be Fed on Waste Paper? - The Sheep Site

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COLOMBIA - A new project at the University of Colombia is looking at feeding waste paper to ruminants, as part of an effort to ensure availability of animal feed in times of poor weather.

100 tons of waste paper a day leaves a company, which the project team said could provide an alternative feed source for cows in Ubaté region.

The project will start by testing the use of waste paper on sheep in the region, using a mixture of 15 per cent waste paper and 85 per cent conventional feed.

George Jaime Tenjo from the university is aiming to tackle two problems in the region through the new project. The first is to prevent the paper going to waste. Secondly, Mr Tenjo hopes that paper added to cattle rations will be ideal in times when feed for livestock is scarce for small and medium producers.

Lack of rain in certain seasons affects the availability of forage or grass to feed livestock. Since the waste paper contains cellulose, which is also present in pasture plants, the idea is that the paper can replace some grazing in the animal's diet.

US (CA): Proposed Argentinian lemon imports worry growers

The USDA is proposing to allow lemon imports from Argentina. The news angers and concerns California citrus officials, who believe that it will expose the U.S. to potential pests and diseases.

Joel Nelsen, president of California Citrus Mutual in Exeter, said in a statement Friday 6 May, “Today while the U.S. industry is fighting to stay vibrant against the ravages of an incurable disease, Huanglongbing, the Obama administration wishes to bring more fruit from pest-infested and diseased areas,” the statement said. “What kind of logic is that?”

California’s lemon industry was valued at $596,124,000 in 2014, with Ventura, Riverside, San Diego, Tulare and Kern counties the leading growers.

USDA officials said the decision to allow lemons from Argentina was done carefully and after a comprehensive pest-risk analysis. As part of that analysis, the USDA’s Animal Plant Health Inspection Service determined that lemons produced in northwest Argentina would be safe to import into the U.S.

The proposed rule will be published in the Federal Register on Tuesday. Comments will be due by July 11, 2016.

Source: fresnobee.com

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NZ growers sign Government Industry Agreement to tackle fruit flies

New Zealand's leading fruit grower groups have signed an operational agreement with the government to reduce the damaging impacts of fruit fly incursions.

The Government Industry Agreement (GIA) was signed by the parties at the B3 – Better Border Biosecurity Conference with the Minister for Primary Industries, marking the first deal of its kind.

Initial signatories include Pipfruit NZ, Kiwifruit Vine Health, New Zealand Avocado Growers Association Inc, New Zealand Citrus Growers Inc and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI).

In a release, Fruit Fly Council chairman Philip Manson said the council was pleased to have finalized the agreement after months of negotiations amongst the parties.

(L-R) Andrew Coleman (MPI), Jen Scoular (NZ Avocado), Minister for Primary Industries, Hon Nathan Guy, Barry O'Neill (KVH), Alan Pollard (Pipfruit NZ), Rebecca Fisher (NZ Citrus Growers Inc), and Philip Manson (NZ Wine Growers)

"This means the horticulture sector and the Ministry for Primary Industries can work together to manage and help reduce the impacts of fruit fly on the sector," Mason said.

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First watermelons picked in Katherine since quarantine over 25 farms lifted

Watermelons are being picked in Katherine's Venn district for the first time in more than 18 months.

Farms across the Northern Territory were placed under quarantine restrictions in October 2014 to control the spread of a plant virus.

The quarantine was lifted in February this year, with new rules making farmers responsible for any re-emergence of the cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) on their property.

After his farm was quarantined, Brett Dawson grew four hectares of melons on a leased block 40 kilometres away on other side of the Katherine River.

Now he is pleased to be back growing on his own land.

"It is good to be doing something again, I've always enjoyed growing melons and we're back," Mr Dawson said.

"Everything looks good so far, the melons are good, I can't complain."

Mr Dawson said he has had no trouble selling his melons to interstate markets.

"Everyone is keen and ready to take on whatever they can," he said.

Mr Dawson said there would likely be a drop in price as Katherine melon farmers began harvesting again.

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Mathematical model predicts spread of HLB of citrus

A mathematical model can help the farmer to assess the impact of Huanglongbing disease (HLB), also known as greening, the citrus crops in the country. The model was developed by mathematics Ana Paula Diniz Marques as part of his dissertation, with guidance Takaaki Ohishi teaching, the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (FEEC), State University of Campinas (Unicamp) and collaboration of Sonia Ternes researcher of Embrapa Information Technology (SP).

To assist producers in the task of controlling the insect that transmits the disease, the mathematical work follows the Based Model approach Individual (MBI), which allows you to check the behavior and spread of the pest over space and time, considering factors such as productivity, spatial distribution, age and health of plants.

 

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May 13, 2016 - Free Webinar "Surveillance & Management of Disease in Prawn Aquaculture "

<p>WebCEPD B-1023 - Surveillance &amp; Management of Disease in Prawn Aquaculture </p>
<p>Join us on May 13, 2016 at 9:00 am GMT for this free webinar. Click on <a href="http://tinyurl.com/he4ua73" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://tinyurl.com/he4ua73</a> to see the time in your time zone anywhere around the world.<br />
Register now! Click on <a href="https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4447063113198957828" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4447063113198957828</a> </p>
<p>About this webinar: This webinar will provide information on the economic importance of prawn/shrimp farming and different farm and hatchery systems, and health management programs. It will also cover the importance of disease surveillance in aquaculture and general wet-mount health check technique for farmed prawn/shrimp.</p>
<p>Learning Objectives - participants will understand:<br />
1. Prawn/shrimp biology and economic importance of prawn/shrimp farming;<br />
2. How to assess prawn/shrimp health status on farm and in hatcheries; and,<br />
3. The main diseases affecting farmed prawns/shrimp.</p>

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