Kenya watching spread of tilapia disease carefully

Details
Promoted
Sites: 
IBIS AH
Author: 
Undercurrent News
Channel: 
Search engines
Text (summary): 

We’ve sent a link to to change your password.

Kenya is keeping a watchful eye on the spread of tilapia lake virus, a disease which could decimate the country's fish production if it were to spread from Egypt, reports The Star.

Experts with the Food and Agricultural Organisation has said the disease has not reached Kenya, but has been confirmed in Egypt and should be taken seriously.

Tilapia lake virus has now been confirmed in five countries on three continents — Colombia, Ecuador, Egypt, Israel and Thailand.

FAO said the disease is not a human health risk but can kill up to 90% of infected fish.

Secretary of the Kenya Veterinary Association, Kenneth Wameyo, said it was important for Kenya to be prepared against the disease.

“Kenya is a major producer and consumer of fish. The earlier we are aware and prepared the better,” he said. Total Kenyan fishery and aquaculture production in 2013 was 186,700 metric tons — most of it from Lake Victoria.

Click here for the full story.

We’ve sent a link to to change your password.

Tags
Locations
LocationCoordinatesRelevanceShow on map
Kenya1°N 38°E0.925Yes
Egypt27°N 30°E0.515No
Colombia4°N 73.25°W0.244No
Ecuador1.25°S 78.25°W0.222No
Thailand15.5°N 101°E0.202No
Israel31.5°N 34.75°E0.191No
Discovery
Source: 
Searched entity: 
Original language: 
Original title: 
Kenya watching spread of tilapia disease carefully
Original text (summary): 

We’ve sent a link to to change your password.

Kenya is keeping a watchful eye on the spread of tilapia lake virus, a disease which could decimate the country's fish production if it were to spread from Egypt, reports The Star.

Experts with the Food and Agricultural Organisation has said the disease has not reached Kenya, but has been confirmed in Egypt and should be taken seriously.

Tilapia lake virus has now been confirmed in five countries on three continents — Colombia, Ecuador, Egypt, Israel and Thailand.

FAO said the disease is not a human health risk but can kill up to 90% of infected fish.

Secretary of the Kenya Veterinary Association, Kenneth Wameyo, said it was important for Kenya to be prepared against the disease.

“Kenya is a major producer and consumer of fish. The earlier we are aware and prepared the better,” he said. Total Kenyan fishery and aquaculture production in 2013 was 186,700 metric tons — most of it from Lake Victoria.

Click here for the full story.

We’ve sent a link to to change your password.

Issues
Issue(s) that this article relates to, if applicable.
Workflow
Status: